How does cortical processing of deviant stimuli shape perception (Semester/Thesis Project)

Background: Successful adaptation to our ever-changing world depends on the ability to shift attention quickly in space and to learn about our immediate environment. A strong driver for automatic attentional shifts are novel and deviating stimuli, which typically results in an enhanced neuronal response compared to expected stimuli. In event-related potentials such deviating stimuli elicit an additional negative wave called Mismatch Negativity (MMN). Little is known about the relationship between the cortical processing of deviants and perception, specifically how it relates to exogenous attentional processes. We designed a new cross-modal behavioral paradigm for mice and combined it with single-neuron recordings. This paradigm allows us to assess whether deviant stimuli trigger attentional reallocation and how this relates to the signal processing in the primary somatosensory cortex.

Project Description:
The work will encompass computational and statistical methods using data-driven analyses and modeling on behavioral and neural data; including spike sorting and multi unit/single unit activity analyses. The project’s outcome will result in a deeper understanding of the neurophysiological mechanisms underlyingType of Work & Requirements:
The applicant should have solid experience in computational sciences, preferably using Python and a great interest in Neuroscience. The successful applicant would have the opportunity to work in an established Neuroscience laboratory encompassing a wide range of specialties spanning experimental, computational, and engineering fields. stimulus specific adaptation and its behavioral relevance.

Type of Work & Requirements:
The applicant should have solid experience in computational sciences, preferably using Python and a great interest in Neuroscience. The successful applicant would have the opportunity to work in an established Neuroscience laboratory encompassing a wide range of specialties spanning experimental, computational, and engineering fields.




Neurotechnology Group - Prof. Fatih Yanik
Dr. Wolfger von der Behrens
 
Contact Person: PhD Student - Newsha Ghasemi Nejad
Email: gnewsha (at) ethz.ch
 
Irchel Campus Y17-L70
Winterthurerstra­­­­­­­­sse 190
8057 Zurich

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